opit

Aug 11
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Then again, perhaps you’ve noticed: You buy your soda in liters and your wine in milliliters. Your aspirin in milligrams. Your bullets in millimeters. Science and engineering are done in système internationale these days. Even weed is sold by the gram, not the “eighth.”
Aug 08
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Aug 07
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Airlines seemed to make no bones in those days about passengers taking rifles on a plane.
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The technology of war has evolved. Living for 10 days under constant drone surveillance in Gaza City, it occurred to me that this might be an early foretaste of what large parts of humanity have to suffer in the 21st century: total asymmetry of force.
Aug 06
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It’s been pretty firmly established that Human Nature is so rife with Confirmation Biases and Backfire Effects that even if you present someone with ironclad, irrefutable, expert evidence that their cherished beliefs are wrong, they’ll just dig in their heels and clutch those beliefs even closer to their bosoms (bosa? bosii?), while at the same time vilifying the expert who contradicted them. It’s not that they don’t understand the arguments; it’s just that they’ll reject anything that’s inconsistent with their preferred worldview. So what we seem to be getting is an increased dumbing-down of complex scientific issues to pander to people who read at a grade-three level. Scientific American turned into Psychology Today sometime when I wasn’t looking. Psychology Today turned into the fucking National Enquirer. The internet slowly fills with TED talks rife with charismatic delivery and vacuous content. And people still don’t give a shit about climate change.
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(Source: youtube.com)

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Aug 04
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Aug 01
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Sourcing parts for our micro hydro powerplant

technariumas:

image

Those are the generator, pulleys and sprockets for the micro hydro powerplant we are putting together this summer.

Jul 31
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A paradox has entered our political discourse: The more controlled and artificial and technological we make the world, the more capable of wild and powerful fancy it becomes. Like Facebook protests, taco delivering drones, antibiotics, graffiti stenciling robots, comicons, carbon-fiber space elevators and custom over-night stickers, reconciliation between control and imagination was beyond imagining in 1921. Now, like Google self-driving cars and Amazon drone deliveries, we only have to wonder how much we want it.
Jul 30
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One Air Force study (Document 3), produced by the service’s Ballistic Missile Division in April 1960, had alternative titles — one classified (Military Lunar Base Program) and one unclassified (S.R. 183 Lunar Observatory Study).
Jul 19
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Jul 15
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tardiscrash:

Let’s be real, in a time before the internet people didn’t have more adventures and make more meaningful connections. They watched TV and listened to CDs. Before that they listened to records and read magazines. Before that they listened to the radio and read bad dime novels. Before that they embroidered or some shit.

People have been staying inside and ignoring other people for as long as there have been buildings. 

(via pst-apclyps)

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brucesterling:

*The situation in the Ukraine isn’t getting any prettier

https://www.flickr.com/photos/brucesterling/sets/72157645661977864/

Jul 10
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To re-word a great Dylan Moran gag: While we were talking, Google very, very gradually built a future around us. (Please replace Google with whatever or whoever you like to satisfy your own biases.) The point stands that the entities constructing and steering our futures, or what they often like to call the future — with all the baggage of powerlessness and inevitability that that wording brings — aren’t states, and they work on a completely different geopolitical strata: There is no town square for Google.

— by Tobias Revell

Colonising the Clouds  — Medium