opit

Jul 19
Permalink
Jul 15
Permalink

tardiscrash:

Let’s be real, in a time before the internet people didn’t have more adventures and make more meaningful connections. They watched TV and listened to CDs. Before that they listened to records and read magazines. Before that they listened to the radio and read bad dime novels. Before that they embroidered or some shit.

People have been staying inside and ignoring other people for as long as there have been buildings. 

(via pst-apclyps)

Permalink

brucesterling:

*The situation in the Ukraine isn’t getting any prettier

https://www.flickr.com/photos/brucesterling/sets/72157645661977864/

Jul 10
Permalink
To re-word a great Dylan Moran gag: While we were talking, Google very, very gradually built a future around us. (Please replace Google with whatever or whoever you like to satisfy your own biases.) The point stands that the entities constructing and steering our futures, or what they often like to call the future — with all the baggage of powerlessness and inevitability that that wording brings — aren’t states, and they work on a completely different geopolitical strata: There is no town square for Google.

— by Tobias Revell

Colonising the Clouds  — Medium

Permalink
Jul 08
Permalink
Once, cypherpunks were mainly interested in seizing privacy for themselves. Now, he says, that’s no longer enough. “When we discovered that we could create private and anonymous communications with math, that was super cool,” he says. “But then after a while I think it dawned on us as a movement that the only conversations you could have with those tools were with other cypherpunks.”
Permalink
In a less broken country, the water crisis would dominate every facet of public life. In Yemen, public life is a joke. The government is so corrupt and paralyzed by crisis that it can’t perform the most basic tasks. The city’s wells are completely unmonitored; no one even knows how many there are. Private owners will keep drilling for as long as they can, but at some point even the deepest wells are going to run dry. And then something awful will happen. Old Sana’a may survive as some kind of a museum exhibit, but in a matter of years (not decades) the rest of this vast city will have to move or die.
Jun 28
Permalink

POCORGTFO04.PDF

technariumas:

Dear neighbours, download this pocorgtfo04 and have a nice fuzzy feeling inside: it’s as if you were living in the times of Fidonet and BBS again.

Jun 27
Permalink
Jun 26
Permalink
Jun 19
Permalink
Jun 15
Permalink
Sharewashing does more than just misrepresent things like renting, working, and surveilling as “sharing.” It does more than just stretch and contort the meaning of the word “sharing” until it practically loses all meaning. It also disables the very promise of an economy based on sharing by stealing the very language we use to talk about it
Permalink
Imagine Google putting its image-recognition capabilities to work to identify and track all of the world’s oil tankers, or count the number of cars in the parking lots of all the Walmarts in the United States, and making that information searchable via the Internet. Conceivably, you could reach a point where Google can do things like estimate changes in a country’s GDP on a daily basis.
Jun 13
Permalink

(Source: scorpiondagger)

Jun 12
Permalink
Kitty litter meant that cats were viable housepets. Cats, appreciative of warmth if indifferent to love, obliged. Lowe’s became one of the great stories of American business—the flash of insight ridiculed by naysayers (who will buy a bag of clay?), countered by a vision and a powerful will to succeed. Who needs a car when they have a horse? Why would movies need sound? Who needs a computer in their home?