opit

Sep 19
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Sep 14
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Čia ne atsakymas: „ir tu skiri jiems laiką, dėmesį ir eterį…“. Ir čia ne atsakymas: „taigi nx juos visus,amen“. Chroniško subjektyvios huinios nesprendimo pasekmė yra dvasinė mirtis
Sep 13
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It takes years of research to make an interesting discovery, and takes much more than a tweet to communicate that discovery to people who are qualified to assess the validity of the discovery and determine the significance of its contribution. More importantly, there was a time when everyone understood that our knowledge was not the sort of thing that could be disseminated by op-ed or blogpost but required the long term mutual commitment of students and teachers in the classroom to be properly understood. What the panel was really doing was redefining what it means to know something. By abandoning “old school” lecturing and classroom discussion, and traditional academic prose, they were simply giving up on the sort of care and attention that makes it possible for us, as a culture, to understand complicated facts.

<…> we are now trying to get people believe things they can’t possibly understand. We are telling them what we think the truth is but without allowing them to engage critically with it. That’s precisely what our classrooms and journals are for. They are situations in which ideas can be presented along with their justifications, and where those justifications can be questioned before the proposed belief is adopted.

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New toy in the workshop

technariumas:

A real functional lathe!

image

Needs some love and could use some XXI century electronics.

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Because the Internet of Things is not about things on the internet. A world in which all our household gadgets can communicate with each other may sound vaguely useful, but it’s not really for us consumers. The Internet of Things serves the interests of the technology giants, in their epic wrangles with each other. And it is they who will turn the jargon of “smart cities” and “smart homes” into a self-fulfilling prophesy. In this piercing and provocative essay, Bruce Sterling tells the story of an idea that just won’t go away because there’s too much money to be made and a whole world to control.
Sep 11
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Going Walden
The often ill-conceived decision to live without connective technologies for a period of time in order to cleanse the spirit.
Sep 09
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How do you represent a place where there is no edge?
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brucesterling:

*It’s won a moral victory, no matter the inevitable end

brucesterling:

*It’s won a moral victory, no matter the inevitable end

(Source: trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

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We’re not programmed to survive, or reproduce, or persist, after all; we’re programmed to like sugar, and sex, and healthy green fractal things. Evolution has no foresight, so nature bribes us with little dopamine rewards whenever we do something to increase our fitness. The problem is, somewhere along the line we got smart enough to figure out how to scam the reward without doing the work.
Sep 08
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Sometimes, just looking into a tidal pool can give you ideas. (Back when I was 11 years old, I looked into a tidal pool and thought Whoa, what if all that plankton was, like, connected somehow like neurons, and what if that meant the whole ocean was, like, a single thinking being?. I even wrote a few pages, but they never went anywhere.) (Just as well, too. A couple of years after that I discovered “Solaris”.)
Sep 07
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Expanding on this notion—that humanity’s longest-lasting ruins will not be cities, cathedrals, or even mines, but rather geostationary satellites orbiting the Earth, surviving for literally billions of years beyond anything we might build on the planet’s surface
Aug 11
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Then again, perhaps you’ve noticed: You buy your soda in liters and your wine in milliliters. Your aspirin in milligrams. Your bullets in millimeters. Science and engineering are done in système internationale these days. Even weed is sold by the gram, not the “eighth.”
Aug 08
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Aug 07
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Airlines seemed to make no bones in those days about passengers taking rifles on a plane.